In the Reign of Terror from Heirloom Audio Productions {Review}

We are one entertained family! Heirloom Audio Productions has done it again with their latest adventure CD: In the Reign of Terror! We have listed to this story over and over again, as well as our other Henty adventures and are enjoying the journey. I definitely need to add more of this thematic education or unit study way of learning to our school days. My stash This makes the fourth disc added to my collection of Heirloom Audio Productions’ G.A. Henty novel dramatizations and we plan to keep adding to it. For the purposes of this review, we received a physical audio CD set and access to download digital components. One of my favorite bits of the digital components is the Study Guide and as my daughter is getting a little bit older, I definitely plan to take more advantage of these components. Radio drama was a big part of my childhood and. . .

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Madame Tussaud by Michelle Moran

The world knows Madame Tussaud as a wax artist extraordinaire . . . but who was this woman who became one of the most famous sculptresses of all time? In these pages, her tumultuous and amazing story comes to life as only Michelle Moran can tell it. The year is 1788, and a revolution is about to begin.

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Guest Post: Michelle Moran – Madame Tussaud

Everything else in my life is on hold while I read the latest from one of my favorite general market historical fiction authors. And here’s a guest post to peak your interest. MADAME TUSSAUD: The Woman When most people hear the name Madame Tussaud, the first thing that comes to mind are the eerily lifelike waxworks which crowd her museums throughout the world. But who was the woman behind the name, and what was she like in the flesh? Madame Tussaud’s story actually began in 18th century Paris. While most people know her from her famous museum in London, it was in France, on the humble Boulevard du Temple, where Marie first got her start as an apprentice in her uncle’s wax museum, the Salon de Cire. At the time, the Boulevard du Temple was crowded with exhibits of every kind. For just a few sous a passerby might attend. . .

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