Memoria Press Kindergarten {Review – Part I}

CMM CCC-K

2013-2014 was our K4 year and our main curriculum has been the Memoria Press Classical Core Curriculum for Kindergarten. (I cannot believe we are already halfway through the next year, these memories seem like yesterday!!) These Lesson Plans are written out for one year. At this point we are within a handful of weeks to completetion, possibly days. This year follows our K3 year with the Memoria Press Junior Kindergarten and prior to that Tot School with various preschool printables and Sonlight P3/4. Please head back to read my several part review on the Memoria Press JrK Curriculum if you’re interested. JrK is written as a 2-day week for 33 weeks, recommended for the general 4-5 year old range. Also, for your information and a side note, Memoria Press is in the process of releasing a leveled pre-JrK program designed for special needs. The plan, to my knowledge, is “to unveil. . .

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PreK3 Curriculum for 2014-2015

Having just finished drafting my post for the K5 Curriculum (even if it is six months late!) I figured perhaps I should also write a post for our PreK3 Curriculum this year as well. As my second child is entering into the world of academia I am learning some important lessons. While AppleBlossom was ready to jump and run early on and loves workbooks and “doing school” things… her sister is, well… a free spirit. OrangeBlossom should have been called PinkBlossom. If it is not pink, princess, or fairy related she’s not interested. All life must involved things that are pretty, beautiful, in skirts and sparkily is a plus. Sitting to “do school”, so not her thing. She will beg for school for a minute or two, and then flit here and there and yonder. OrangeBlossom is my here, there and yonder child at three years old. Who know what the. . .

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Favorite Curriculum Choices – How to answer that???

So here I was, minding my own business and updating my “Previous Curricula” page. Then I was drafting out a “plan” post for the summer and fall to come this year when I stumbled upon the calendar for the TOS Crew where I had the option to participate in a blog carnival with the theme of sharing my Favorite Curriculum Choices. How appropriate that my mind is already here!? I figure that I could just think back on this last year and share my favorite choices, but that seems unfair especially since I’m considering my earlier and past choices as my younger daughter gets closer to truly starting “school”. So I figure I’ll give you levels and my choices within. Also if you’re curious, you might want to step back and read my Wrapping Up the End of the Homeschool Year (2013-2014) post as well for more details. Link backs:. . .

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Logic of English: Foundations, Level A Cursive (Science of Reading) {Review}

(This is a long post… I’ve debating breaking it into parts… but oh well.)

Today, I get to share with you a new treasure to our family in our homeschool curriculum and I’m delighted to review this new-to-me program that I definitely want to stick with on further levels in the Logic of English ~ (http://www.LogicofEnglish.com). I was granted the blessing to obtain and use Foundations, Level A as well as a set of reusable resources, and the iOS Doodling Dragons App. I was curious about the curriculum, but had no idea the delight that we were in for on this adventure!
Logic of English Review
The Logic of English: Foundations program is recommended for ages 4 to 7 and is designed to easily be used in schools, homeschool settings, older struggling readers, and English Language Learners. I’m certain it would make a good addition to a co-op setting. The Level A is for the beginning reader and opens the world of reading through basic phonogram knowledge, beginning handwriting skills, short vowel and consonant blends decoding.

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Ok, let’s talk phonics readers

Do you have much experience with Beginning Readers or Phonics Readers? Via TWTM and my own childhood I’m familiar with BOB Books. Through Memoria Press I’m getting the recommendation for EPS readers, which I have not yet seen in person. Via SisterL I’ve gotten my hands on some old version BOB Books including a Set A2, Set B1, Set B2 and some Step into Reading Phonics readers. All between 8-12 booklets per set. Then through review products I’ve gotten my hands on My First BOB Books Alphabet, My First BOB Books Pre-Readers, and BOB Books Beginning Readers (blue box). Then… I had my SIL buy for me the Cosco sets available. So that got me a large combo version on the My First Readers, Collections 1, 2, & 3, and Sight Words (combo of K and 1st sets). The only one I don’t have that I don’t think is available. . .

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Memoria Press Junior Kindergarten {Review – Part II – Phonics}

CMM JrK Review

Coming into starting Jr. K, AppleBlossom already knew her alphabet. She could sing it in order (only half the time skipping N and then insisting she had said too) and she could identify letters out of order both upper and lowercase. Also, thanks to LeapFrog Phonics Letter Factory DVD she knew all the sounds as well. What she did not know was how to write any letter other than a capital A that I had just showed her one day randomly. So I knew I needed something organized to really work through them all.

Learning the alphabet is the critical first step in learning how to read. The Alphabet Book teaches letter recognition, letter formation, and pencil grip through repetition and tracing.

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My Little Pony Phonics Fun by Joanne Mattern

My Little Pony Phonics Fun by Joanne Mattern Illustrated by Carlo Lo Raso Genre: Juvenile Fiction / Beginning Readers – My First I Can Read! Ages 4 to 8, Grades P to 3 Pages: 12 pages each in 12 little books 5 x 5 Date Published: March 11, 2008 Publisher: HarperCollins Children’s Phonics comes to life with My Little Pony! This I Can Read line extension features a box holding 12 little books—covers all the short vowel sounds, and more! As I have said before, teaching a child to read is a long term project and I love the idea of little phonics readers like the Bob Books so it excites me that the HarperCollins I Can Read! series is coming out with Phonics Fun packages that are little boxes full of phonics readers. While these are the same size and similar looking to Bob Books these are not the. . .

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Biscuit Phonics Fun by Alyssa Satin Capucilli

Phonics is fun with Biscuit! Based on the lastest research about how children learn to read, these twelve full-color books feature repeated examples of short vowel sounds and common sight words. The simple stories about the little yellow puppy will make the process of learning to read fun.

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My First Bob Books – Pre-Reading Skills

Sally the Circle and her friends introduce important skills that help prepare your child for reading. Your youngsters will never know that they’re learning as they follow the adventures of Sally, Seth and Tanner – but you will. Pre-reading skills introduced in this 12 book set include:

Identifying basic shapes in preparation for letter recognition
Sorting, classifying and symbol identification to build important problem-solving skills
Recognizing simple patterns to create awareness of letter groups and sight words
Sequencing to strengthen the ability to predict how stories flow

The Parent Guide offers additional activities, games and tips designed to support new concepts and build a foundation for reading.

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My First Bob Books – Alphabet

In 12 playful books, familiar animal friends progressively introduce the 26 letters of the alphabet. Engaging, read-aloud stories inspire and motivate your child, while proven teaching principles inspire success. Your child will prepare for the magic of reading as My First Bob Books • Alphabet guides them through these stages:

Realizing that written language represents spoken language
Learning the names of the letters
Realizing that letters represent sounds
Learning which letters represent which sounds

Hidden pictures challenge kids to find objects with featured sounds and the Parent Guide offers additional teaching tips and activities to support kids’ growth and build confidence.

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The Ordinary Parent’s Guide to Teaching Reading

A plain-English guide to teaching phonics. Every parent can teach reading; no experts need apply!

Take charge of your child’s literacy with this jargon-free phonics guide. Too many parents watch their children struggle with early reading skills — and don’t know how to help. Phonics programs are too often complicated, overpriced, gimmicky, and filled with obscure educationalese. The Ordinary Parent’s Guide to Teaching Reading cuts through the confusion, giving parents a simple, direct, scripted guide to teaching reading — from short vowels through supercalifragilisticexpialidocious. The Ordinary Parent’s Guide to Teaching Reading is user-friendly, affordable, and easy to follow — supplying you with everything you need to teach reading in one book.

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